Victoria’s native delicacies connects | Vancouver solar

Links to the breadcrumb trail

Guests are spoiled for choice

Author of the article:

Jane Mundy

Publication date:

13th August 201913th August 20193 minutes read Join the conversation Saveur's chef / owner, Robert Cassels, was named “Best Fine Dining” and “Best Brunch” by YAM magazine. Saveur’s chef / owner, Robert Cassels, was named “Best Fine Dining” and “Best Brunch” by YAM magazine.

Reviews and recommendations are impartial and products are independently selected. Postmedia can earn affiliate commission from purchases made through links on this page.

Article content

It’s hard to imagine that in the not-too-distant past, classy dining in Victoria usually meant French or Italian – food and wine imported – from just a few decent restaurants. There was no west coast cuisine. Now it seems like the city’s most popular restaurants with farm and forest-to-table cuisine outdo each other and focus on everything local.

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

For most of us, the concept of eating local, seasonal ingredients began in 2007 with the release of the best-selling 100-Mile Diet, written by two Canadians who ate foods within 100 miles of theirs for a year Residence were grown. Victoria chefs in particular have embraced and refined this concept so well that they only prepared our taste buds for local and seasonal dishes. Who’s in the mood for coconut?

Shortly after the book became a bestseller, I was one of four food writers asked to cook a four-course meal within 100 miles of Vancouver. It was’nt easy. Neither bread nor pasta was on the menu because no wheat was grown anywhere in BC. Kelp powder has been replaced with salt and I almost screwed it up with the local wine because it contained an Okanagan blend.

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

TopSoil, an urban farm on Harbor Road, just across from Johnson Street Bridge. TopSoil, an urban farm on Harbor Road, just across from Johnson Street Bridge. Photo by Jane Mundy

If you’re asked to create a menu now within 100 miles of Victoria, it’s easy as pie. I would start with gin & tonic and a hint of lemon – gin and citrus from Sooke. On the table would be true grain bread, made from Red Fife flour grown and ground on Vancouver Island, and a bowl of Pender Island olives. I could serve pasta, either flour or seaweed, even Cowichan Valley tea, all without cheating. When it comes to wine, you are spoiled for choice.

And Victoria’s dinners are spoiled for choice. Many restaurants are raising the bar in terms of service and space, and of course also in terms of food – with the best ingredients on the island. Saveur, a narrow 30-seat restaurant on the outskirts of Chinatown, was recently rightly named Victoria’s Restaurant of the Year by YAM magazine. Judging by the passion and support for the local food industry, along with other details like decor and culinary expertise, it’s no wonder head chef and owner Robert Cassels also won Best Fine Dining and Best Brunch awards.

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

Just five years ago, Chef Cassels had the vision of transforming a former shoe factory on Herald Street into Saveur. He built this beautiful room from the floorboards up, with gilded historic brick walls and a vibrant green wall behind the chic bar. And there is the food. “How does he do that?” We pondered for about three hours, starting with Sun Wing Farm tomatoes, the first of the five-course tasting menu. Sea asparagus with a pressed cucumber and oyster emulsion, paired with Rathjen Cellars Wine Bunker White, tingled both in the head and in the palate like every course. If you fancy a land trip, visit Rathjen Cellars in Saanich for a tasting; They blend grapes mostly from Saanich vineyards (two from Duncan’s) and the pinot noir is great.

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content

Boom + Batten, the new overwater restaurant in Victoria's Inner Harbor. Boom + Batten, the new overwater restaurant in Victoria’s Inner Harbor. Photo by Jane Mundy

At Boom + Batten, the new “over-water” restaurant in the inner harbor of Victoria, I sipped “Orca Song”, a wonderful turquoise G&T made from gin, kombu and sake from the award-winning Sheringham Distillery, while I struggled for decided to share which small plates from the creative menu – almost everything was tasty.

We made brilliant choices: cabbage, potato and basil cakes; TopSoil Greens; roasted vegetable pizza; Taglietti with meatballs and ended with an outrageously chilled rhubarb and strawberry consommé. And a DJ lets this pulsating room start up after sunset. Be sure to take home a box of macarons. The next day I bought a box of lettuce greens at TopSoil, an urban farm on Harbor Road (right across from Johnson Street Bridge and a stone’s throw from Fol Epi, undoubtedly the best bakery in town), where you can’t beat freshly picked.

Rathjen Cellars in Saanich mixes grapes from Saanich vineyards. Rathjen Cellars in Saanich mixes grapes from Saanich vineyards. Photo by Jane Mundy

The line-up at Nourish starts around 8:30 a.m. Located in a historic house from 1888, guests say it’s like coming to Grandma’s house, and owner Haley Rosenberg attributes her grandmother’s expertise to her success. It is a restaurant that makes people happy and healthy, Rosenberg’s vision.

Skip the line and dine at sister restaurant Charlotte & The Quail, located in the beautiful Gardens at the Horticulture of the Pacific (HCP). Go for the superb “golden” breakfast and you will likely bypass lunch. And the Sleeping Beauty pancakes are heavenly. This also applies to Victoria’s food scene.

Share this article on your social network

advertising

This ad hasn’t loaded yet, but your article continues below.

By clicking the registration button, you agree to receive the above newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link at the bottom of our emails. Postmedia Network Inc. | 365 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 3L4 | 416-383-2300

Remarks

Postmedia advocates a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their thoughts on our articles. It can take up to an hour for comments to be moderated before they appear on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We turned on email notifications – you will now receive an email when you’ve received a reply to your comment, there’s an update on a comment thread you’re following, or when a user you follow follows comments . Check out our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to customize your email settings.

Comments are closed.